Spend a Day with the Colin Powell School Feb. 27

Since its inauguration last May, the Colin Powell School’s programming—including public lectures, service-learning courses, partnerships between faculty and community organizations, and more—is driven by our desire to blend the intellectual resources of a public university with the diverse energy of the city: its leaders, its communities, its global network.

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Since its inauguration last May, the Colin Powell School’s programming—including public lectures, service-learning courses, partnerships between faculty and community organizations, and more—is driven by our desire to blend the intellectual resources of a public university with the diverse energy of the city: its leaders, its communities, its global network.

On February 27, we invite you to “Spend a Day with City College,” where you’ll get an insider’s view of our plans for the future. Continue reading “Spend a Day with the Colin Powell School Feb. 27”

What do we mean by ‘Human Rights’?

There were a couple points of resonance that emerged in discussions as we began to organize the Human Rights forum. First, we agreed that regardless of whether our disciplines were more “humanistic” or “scientific,” so much of our engagement as administrators, advisors, faculty, staff, and professionals involves human rights. Second, we realized we must first raise an elementary question: “What do we mean by human rights?”

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Updated 11/15: View a webcast of the first Human Right forum event here.

By Alessandra Benedicty, assistant professor of literature; director of Masters program in the Study of the Americas at the Division of Interdisciplinary Studies, Center for Worker Education, City College of New York

The “Human Rights: A Yearlong Forum at City College of New York” series is, first and foremost, an invitation, and then, as most invitations are, a gesture. The invitation is to all those who are in our City College community—faculty, students, advisors, staff, alumni, community member, or just a visitor passing through—to partake in this yearlong forum. The gesture is offering a space for all to listen, learn, and exchange within the CUNY system, but also with and alongside specialists and friends of our larger extended community. Continue reading “What do we mean by ‘Human Rights’?”

Revisiting Ghosted History

Last week I had the opportunity to welcome an audience of fifty to a film screening and forum for the documentary Memory of Forgotten War. This compelling documentary focuses on the 60th anniversary of the Korean War Armistice, sharing the deeply personal stories of four Korean War survivors. These narratives include dealing with, for some, recollections of daily bombings, searching for missing family members, and struggling to survive in a newly divided Korea.

Memory of Forgotten War
Memory of Forgotten War was screened at CCNY Nov. 21.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

by Katherine Cho, Program Coordinator, Colin Powell School

Last week I had the opportunity to welcome an audience of fifty to a film screening and forum for the documentary Memory of Forgotten War. This compelling documentary focuses on the 60th anniversary of the Korean War Armistice, sharing the deeply personal stories of four Korean War survivors. These narratives include dealing with, for some, recollections of daily bombings, searching for missing family members, and struggling to survive in a newly divided Korea.

With the division at the 38th parallel, residents of either country could no longer communicate with one another, and families that once easily moved between neighboring cities were cut off from each other. In addition to the forced physical separation, the documentary also highlighted the societal pressure of distancing any ties with North Korea relations, family members, and friends. Continue reading “Revisiting Ghosted History”

Supreme Conversations: Justice Sotomayor and Adam Liptak visit CCNY

The Honorable Sonia Sotomayor, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, will visit City College of New York Monday evening to discuss growing up ‘Nuyorican’ in the Bronx. Sotomayor, who endured a difficult childhood dominated by her father’s alcoholism and his subsequent death, will discuss those years and her path of scholarly and professional excellence, which led to her becoming the first Hispanic justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. Justice Sotomayor’s visit is timed to the new paperback release of her memoir, My Beloved World.

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Updated 12/14: View a webcast of Justice Sotomayor’s visit here.

The Honorable Sonia Sotomayor, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, will visit City College of New York Monday evening to discuss growing up ‘Nuyorican’ in the Bronx. Sotomayor, who endured a difficult childhood dominated by her father’s alcoholism and his subsequent death, will discuss those years and her path of scholarly and professional excellence, which led to her becoming the first Hispanic justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Justice Sotomayor’s visit is timed to the new paperback release of her memoir, My Beloved World. In a recent interview with National Public Radio, Justice Sotomayor said she chose to write a “searingly candid” portrait of her life, in part, because “[t]o move people beyond just dreaming to doing, they have to be able to see that you’re just like them, and you still made it.”

Continue reading “Supreme Conversations: Justice Sotomayor and Adam Liptak visit CCNY”

Powell School’s New Breakfast Series: “Conversations with City”

Conversations with City is a dynamic and stimulating addition to event programming at the Powell School. The series serves as an open forum for experts, policymakers, community leaders, and others attempting to meet the major challenges of the nation and the world.

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by Dee Dee Mozeleski, Director of Development, Colin L. Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership

The driving mission behind the Powell School at the City College of New York is to be a leading center for social research, expertise, learning, and leadership. An important part of this ongoing effort is to disseminate research and public policy information to concerned audiences, particularly those working to redress social, political or economic disparities. So it is with great enthusiasm that we officially announce our new series of public breakfast talks, Conversations with City.

Conversations with City is a dynamic and stimulating addition to event programming at the Powell School. The series serves as an open forum for experts, policymakers, community leaders, and others attempting to meet the major challenges of the nation and the world. Continue reading “Powell School’s New Breakfast Series: “Conversations with City””

Dean Spade’s ‘Critical Trans Politics’

n his book, Normal Life, Spade uses critical race theory, women-of-color feminism, and other intellectual traditions to analyze the role of law reform in contemporary queer and trans politics. He examines the poverty, violence, criminalization and immigration-enforcement facing trans populations, and questions the utility of anti-discrimination law and hate-crimes laws for addressing these harms. He proposes that a critical trans politics is emerging that rejects law reform as a goal and engages tactically with legal work as it attempts to dismantle apparatuses of racialized-gendered violence like prisons and borders and build alternative structures that meaningfully address contemporary conditions of poverty and violence.

Dean Spade will visit City College Monday, October 28.  Photo: Johanna Breidling.
Dean Spade will visit City College Monday, October 28.
Photo: Johanna Breidling.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you aren’t yourself an LGBTQ person or activist, you’d be forgiven for believing LGBTQ rights movements begin and end with marriage rights.

Marriage equality debates have dominated public discourse related to LGBTQ civil rights. And many activists claim it is to the exclusion of crucial policy discussions addressing struggles many LGBTQ people face—particularly youth, people of color, the economically challenged, and those who identify as gender non-conforming, intersex, or transgender.

Dean Spade, a lawyer and transgender rights activist, was focused on addressing the vulnerability of these intersecting populations when he founded the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, a legal aid organization, in 2002 with the mission to help transgender, intersex, and gender non-conforming people who are low-income and/or people of color. He recognized the high levels of poverty and over-incarceration among these communities and directly addressed the correlation between economic injustice and gender discrimination. Continue reading “Dean Spade’s ‘Critical Trans Politics’”

The Powell School: Building Mission and Meaning

Even before moving into the details of merging the Colin Powell Center and Division of Social Sciences, I had some ideas about what it meant to become a school. A school would have a presence and identity more powerful and unified than separate departments and programs. A school would be an institution with specific and publicly discernible commitments and capacities. A school would have a mission—both on campus, and in the life of our city and nation. Children in the neighborhoods around City College and across the globe will be able to point to our campus and say, “The Powell School is there. That’s where I’m going to go.”

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by Vince Boudreau, Director, Colin Powell Center

In the weeks leading up to the inauguration of the Powell School this past May 2nd, I spent time asking certain questions of myself and virtually anyone else who would listen: What does it mean to become a school? What should it mean to teach and study at the Colin L. Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, and to reside near it in the adjacent neighborhoods of Harlem and Washington Heights? How should campus life change in response to this new institution in our midst?

Continue reading “The Powell School: Building Mission and Meaning”

Tending Our Gardens

BMGF NYC School visitsby Terri N. Watson, Ph.D., School of Education, City College of New York

The final line of Tupac Shakur’s elegy “The Rose that Grew from Concrete” reads, “Long live the rose that grew from concrete when no one else cared.” In this poem the fallen rapper marvels at how a rose flourished despite its perilous environment. This feat rings true not only for Shakur’s rose but also for thousands of children who bloom in New York City’s schools. They grow despite their dismal realities influenced, in part, by Mayor Bloomberg’s school-reform efforts. Continue reading “Tending Our Gardens”