Engaged Scholarship at the Colin Powell School: Service Learning

Check out our new video documenting a service-learning course taught last semester through the Colin Powell School’s political science department. The video highlights just one of the exciting ways faculty and staff at the Colin Powell School and the City College of New York are transforming the traditional classroom experience through engaged scholarship.

Advertisements

Daisy Dominguez

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out our new video documenting a service-learning course taught last semester through the Colin Powell School’s political science department.

Continue reading “Engaged Scholarship at the Colin Powell School: Service Learning”

Fitting the Profile, Fixing the System

An ambitious and talented student of law and policy, Mohammed Alam was a committed activist committed to ending the use of New York Police Department’s abusive and discriminatory Stop and Frisk policy. Here he shares his own story of police harassment that happened earlier this year.

Photo: Unarmed Civilian, Flickr Creative Commons License
Photo: Unarmed Civilian, Flickr Creative Commons License

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An ambitious and talented student of law and policy, Mohammed Alam has also been a committed activist to ending the use of the New York Police Department’s abusive and discriminatory Stop and Frisk policy. Here he shares his own story of police harassment that happened earlier this year. 

We publish Alam’s account just days after the tragic death of Eric Garner on Staten Island, a few weeks after the settlement of a civil suit against the City of New York by the Central Park Five, and six months after Mayor deBlasio announced he would not appeal a federal judge’s ruling that Stop and Frisk is discriminatory and requires reform.

by Mohammed Alam, CCNY ’14, Colin Powell School Community Engagement Fellow Alumnus

This year I graduated Magna Cum Laude from the City College of New York. And this year I was also stopped, harassed, thrown in a jail cell, and denied my civil rights by the NYPD. The following is my account of an event that, in the most real way, changed my understanding of and trust in law and justice.

On a cold and tiring Monday night last March, I was driving home from a meeting in Brooklyn. This was not out of the ordinary; I attend this community meeting on the first Monday of every month and had done so for well over a year. What was out of the ordinary was what followed next.

Continue reading “Fitting the Profile, Fixing the System”

Beyond Hobby Lobby

supremecourt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

by Amanda Krupman, Digital Communications Manager, Colin Powell School

On Monday, the Supreme Court of the United States issued a highly contentious decision in the Burwell v. Hobby Lobby case, in which the Court ruled 5-4 that a for-profit company can invoke religious beliefs in order to deny paying for otherwise government-mandated contraception to their employees.

Three days later, the Court delivered another ruling on ACA-related contraception, this time an unsigned emergency order for injunction for Wheaton College, a Christian college in Illinois. This decision offered another exemption from the Affordable Care Act’s provision of free birth control with all insurance plans. In this case, however, the ruling installs a further barrier to contraception for Wheaton College staff, faculty, and students—and according to a fiercely worded dissent by Justices Sotomayor, Kagan, and Ginsburg, contradicts elements of the Hobby Lobby ruling and “undermines confidence in this institution.” Continue reading “Beyond Hobby Lobby”