Marriage Equality Discussed in the Court, On the Web

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments today in its much anticipated review of two cases challenging limits on marriage bans for same-sex couples: Hollingsworth v. Perry, which concerns the voter-initiated state constitutional ban on same-sex marriages known as Prop 8, and U.S. v Windsor, which challenges the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), a reactionary piece of congressional legislation signed into law nearly twenty years ago by then-president Bill Clinton.

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By Amanda Krupman, Communications Coordinator

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments today in its much anticipated review of two cases challenging marriage bans for same-sex couples: Hollingsworth v. Perry, which concerns the voter-initiated state constitutional ban on same-sex marriages known as Prop 8, and U.S. v Windsor, which challenges the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), a reactionary piece of congressional legislation signed into law nearly twenty years ago by then-president Bill Clinton.

Today the Justices heard Prop 8 arguments: By noon, spectators leaving the courthouse were tweeting their impressions, with most analysts predicting that the Court would let Prop 8 stand. All eyes were on Justice Kennedy, as he has been of a friend of LGBT civil rights in the past and is considered a swing vote on an otherwise evenly divided liberal or conservative panel.

Continue reading “Marriage Equality Discussed in the Court, On the Web”

The Center’s Engaged Scholarship Program Seeks 2013 Faculty Fellows

Yes, eligible faculty members, the 2013 Faculty Fellowship Program recruitment season is in full swing! Fellowships are available in three categories: Service-Learning, Community-Based Participatory Research (CBR), and Public Scholarship.

2012 Public Scholarship Fellow John Krinsky presenting with a community partner
2012 Public Scholarship Fellow John Krinsky presenting with a community partner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 2013 Faculty Fellowship Program recruitment season is in full swing. Fellowships are available in three categories: Service-Learning, Community-Based Participatory Research (CBR), and Public Scholarship.

Continue reading “The Center’s Engaged Scholarship Program Seeks 2013 Faculty Fellows”

Community Crisis Response: Mass Incarceration and the “New Jim Crow”

Middle of Nowhere is a fictional story, but the struggles of its main protagonist, who waits five years for her boyfriend’s release, are shared by an overwhelming number of Americans. For over a decade, the U.S. incarceration rate has ranked as the world’s highest. The flaws and unjust policies threaded throughout America’s criminal justice system are numerous and wide-ranging. So it follows that there’s no shortage of advocates pushing for reform. a growing movement of coalitions and think-tanks is taking a more aggressive rhetorical tack. is gaining traction with a broader audience. Whether that attention brings about the momentum to implement effective and humane policies in our correctional system still remains to be seen.

Mass Incarceration Protest. Photo by The Ordinary People Society (TOPS); used with permission. By Amanda Krupman

At Ingersoll Community Center in downtown Brooklyn, an intergenerational audience filled folding chairs lining a gymnasium. The crowd had come for a screening and discussion of the award-winning film, Middle of Nowhere, which examines the impact that incarceration has on relationships between prisoners and the women living “on the other side of the fence.”
Continue reading “Community Crisis Response: Mass Incarceration and the “New Jim Crow””

Free Arts NYC Seeks Volunteer Mentors and Art Educators

Free Arts NYC is a nonprofit organization that provides underserved New York City children and their families with a combination of educational arts and mentoring programs that help foster critical emotional skills. All programs are free for participants and are staffed almost entirely by volunteers.

By Noel Kanalley, NYC Civic Corps Member and Volunteer Associate

Free Arts NYC kids and volunteers at work...er...play!
Free Arts NYC kids and volunteers at work…er…play!

One in three New York City children live below the poverty line, and many are frequently exposed to neglect, abuse, and violence. Afterschool programs help these children by offering them new dimensions and opportunities, shoring up their capacity to overcome early trauma and face future life challenges. Unfortunately, year after year, more programs are cut or scaled back due to lack of funding. Free Arts NYC is one organization attempting to fill the gap.

Free Arts NYC is a nonprofit organization that provides underserved New York City children and their families with a combination of educational arts and mentoring programs that help foster critical emotional skills. All programs are free for participants and are staffed almost entirely by volunteers. Continue reading “Free Arts NYC Seeks Volunteer Mentors and Art Educators”

“Conversations in Leadership”: Maya Wiley on the Power to Transform

You could say Maya Wiley took AP classes on power and privilege while she was still learning to add and subtract. Wiley, who addressed CCNY students on February 21 as part of the Center’s “Conversations in Leadership” series, was raised in Washington, D.C. at the tail-end of the civil rights movement.“I recognized that I wasn’t an organizer like my parents,” Wiley told students, “but I could argue, and there was power in that position to transform the law.” Wiley is president of the Center for Social Inclusion (CSI), a nonprofit based in New York City. She has worked as a civil rights attorney, policy advocate, and adviser for more than twenty years, addressing structural racial inequity in the U.S. and South Africa.

Maya Wiley. Photo: Dennis Drenner
Maya Wiley. Photo: Dennis Drenner

By Amanda Krupman, Communications Coordinator

You could say Maya Wiley took AP classes on power and privilege while she was still learning to add and subtract. Wiley, who addressed CCNY students on February 21 as part of the Center’s “Conversations in Leadership” series, was raised in Washington, D.C. at the tail-end of the civil rights movement. Black communities and their organizers, including her parents, had just turned a corner from the institutionalized racism of Jim Crow and were fighting a system still mired in inequity.

“I want to be a judge,” announced six-year-old Wiley to her parents and other organizers crowded on their living room floor. “That’s who has the power.” It was past her bedtime, but she had been paying close attention: The group was in a tense meeting after protesters rallying for economic justice were jailed overnight at a malicious judge’s behest. Continue reading ““Conversations in Leadership”: Maya Wiley on the Power to Transform”