Korean Issues and Insights: Upcoming Events

This semester, the Center continues to host area scholars and activists offering their views and research into contemporary Korea and Korean-American relations. The Korean Issue and Insights Program, made possible through a grant from the Korea Foundation, will present three guest lectures and a film screening, all open to the public.

* Professor Charles Armstrong, Columbia University, will be on campus February 27 to discuss how the Korean War effected the relationship between the two Koreas and made way for the emergence of new world order in East Asia. The lecture will be held in NAC 6/114 from 7:15 to 9:45 P.M.

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Traditional Korean Pattern: courtesy Dan Cheong, Creative Commons, Flickr.com
Traditional Korean Pattern: courtesy Dan Cheong, Creative Commons, Flickr.com

This semester, the Center continues to host area scholars and activists offering their views and research into contemporary Korea and Korean-American relations. The Korean Issues and Insights Program, made possible through a grant from the Korea Foundation, will present three guest lectures and a film screening, all open to the public. Continue reading “Korean Issues and Insights: Upcoming Events”

Class Acts: Service-Learning for Teacher Candidates

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By Shira Eve Epstein, Asst. Professor, and Andrew Ratner, Asst. Professor, School of Education, CCNY

The results are in: Teacher candidates engaged in service-learning report an enhanced readiness and confidence in their abilities as teachers.

Teacher candidates—graduate and undergraduate students who are studying to be teachers—need meaningful experiences in real schools. Ideally, candidates have adequate time in the classroom, both to observe highly skilled practitioners and lead lessons themselves.

As teacher educators at City College’s School of Education, we are committed to having our candidates engage in this clinical practice as part of their coursework. To this end, we have, in recent years, designed service-learning assignments that put candidates to work in city schools. We are able to partner with excellent teachers who create dynamic roles for our candidates in their classrooms.

Our teacher candidates have always completed fieldwork hours, but often the quality and quantity of their real-world experience was left to chance. Embedding service-learning into the fieldwork ensures that our candidates can better structure their time in the classroom—to their benefit as well as to the teachers and students they serve. In addition, the service-learning model allows for the particulars of an assignment to be determined by the teacher in conversation with the candidate, increasing the likelihood that teachers receive real support in areas that they identify. Naturally, we continue to revisit and revise our service-learning project descriptions and deepen our relationships with teachers in the field. So, while our work is still evolving, we are off to a good start.

By raising the bar for our candidates, entrusting them with more responsibility, and having higher expectations for their overall participation, service-learning has our candidates reflecting more often and more frequently putting ideas from their studies into practice—that is, beginning to do a teacher’s work.

Read more about Drs. Epstein and Ratner and our other contributors here.

Thurs. Feb. 28: “Post-Atlantic America: A Conversation with Reihan Salam”

Join us on February 28 for the Inaugural Anne and Bernard Spitzer Lecture: “Post-Atlantic America: A Conversation with Reihan Salam” Reihan Salam, a policy analyst, is the lead writer of National Review online’s The Agenda, a policy adviser at Economics 21, a fellow of the National Review Institute, a CNN contributor, and a contributing editor of National Affairs. He

Reihan SalamJoin us on February 28 at 4:30 p.m. for the Inaugural Anne and Bernard Spitzer Symposium: “Post-Atlantic America: A Conversation with Reihan Salam” Reihan Salam, a policy analyst, is the lead writer of National Review online’s The Agenda, a policy adviser at Economics 21, a fellow of the National Review Institute, a CNN contributor, and a contributing editor of National Affairs. He will be joined in conversation with Raj Menon, the Bernard Spitzer chair in International Relations, and Dan DiSalvo, assistant professor of political science at City College. Continue reading “Thurs. Feb. 28: “Post-Atlantic America: A Conversation with Reihan Salam””

Kofi Annan Talk Spotlights Global Affairs and Leadership

Former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan joined in a wide-ranging discussion with John H. Ruggie, professor of Human Rights and International Affairs at Harvard University, who served as Annan’s assistant secretary-general for strategic planning. The February 8 talk at the City College of New York was sponsored by the Colin L. Powell Center for Leadership and Service and the City College Division of Social Science. The event marked the completion of a six-year joint CCNY-Yale University project to research, collect, organize, and publish the official papers of Kofi Annan.

Kofi Annan and John H. Ruggie in conversation at City College.

By Maura Christopher, Director of Publications, Colin Powell Center

With the fate of Syria dominating headlines, former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan called on Friday for a political solution to the conflict. “Military intervention will only make things worse.” said Annan, who served during 2012 as Joint Special Envoy to Syria for the United Nations and the League of Arab States.

Continue reading “Kofi Annan Talk Spotlights Global Affairs and Leadership”

Lottery Tickets, Welfare Recipients, and “Taliban Stam”

Paul Stam’s broader effort to curb lottery practices could point the way towards public policy of some merit. His initial statement on the matter was, “We’re giving them welfare to help them live, and yet by selling them a ticket we’re taking away their money that is there to provide them the barest necessities.” This is in many ways a reasonable and concise description of the function of lotteries in the United States. They are a regressive tax, meant to target the “undeserving” among the poor, functioning as what a Maryland legislator once called “welfare in reverse.”

lottery_tickets. "This is what I do all day." Photo by Lottery Monkey on Flickr, courtesy Creative CommonsThe following piece by Matthew Vaz, a Public Scholar at the Colin Powell Center and a   lecturer in the Department of History at the City College of New York is reprinted from Huffington Post. View original post, published on Feb. 4, 2013, here.

North Carolina legislator Paul “Skip” Stam stirred quite a bit of controversy last month with his proposal to ban welfare recipients in the state from buying lottery tickets. He has since backed away from explicitly targeting citizens on welfare, yet it is worth taking a moment to reflect on lotteries, welfare and Mr. Stam himself. Continue reading “Lottery Tickets, Welfare Recipients, and “Taliban Stam””